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Misconceptions About Healthcare & Healthcare Departments

Misconceptions About Healthcare & Healthcare Departments

Healthcare companies are managed by a variety of different people, depending on the size and type of company.  For smaller companies, the management team may consist of just a few people, while larger companies may have hundreds or even thousands of managers.

The most important thing for healthcare company management is to make sure that the company is run smoothly and efficiently. This means that managers need to be able to handle a variety of tasks, from financial management to customer service.

They also need to be able to work with other managers in order to ensure that the company is meeting its goals. In addition, healthcare company management teams need to be able to communicate effectively with each other in order to ensure everyone is on the same page.

In large companies, highest-ranked hospitals and healthcare facilities, it's usually departments that are in charge of different aspects of the company.  There is a department that handles Marketing, another overseeing Human Resources, while another department handles Finance.

Many healthcare companies have departments that only handle reimbursement from health insurance companies. This type of team would be responsible for making sure that the company gets paid by the insurance companies. Some companies educate their teams to be able to handle reimbursement and to know more about the revenue cycle of the facility or the company as a whole.

In smaller companies, however, it's more common for one person or department to handle multiple, or for one person that wears multiple hats, in charge of many or several aspects of the organization.

However, there is only one main person who is mainly responsible for all aspects, who people will either blame or credit based on overall performance, known as the CEO or Chief Executive Officer. The CEO is responsible for making sure that the company is run efficiently and that it meets its goals. They also typically have a team of other managers who help, work, and report to them. Overall, it's a complex system of people who represent and manage many different aspects of the healthcare organization's management. However, the most important thing is that the company is operating smoothly and efficiently, so that they are providing good care to patients and running at a level of profitability.

With the complexity of running these larger healthcare organizations, there are many either misconceptions and misconceptions regarding what healthcare management actually does.  Let's take a look at 32 of the most common healthcare departments and what they are actually in charge of :

 

Common Misconceptions About Healthcare Departments

 

 Image: National Cancer Institute@Unsplash

 

I.  The Human Resources (HR) department is only responsible for hiring and firing employees.

Truth:  Responsible also for employee benefits, payroll, wellness, insurance, company moral, and employee relations.

 

II.  The Marketing department is only responsible for advertising and promoting the company.

Truth:  Responsible for market research, product development, and public relations.

 

III.  The Accounting department is only responsible for keeping track of company's finances.

Truth:  Responsible for budgeting, financial planning, and auditing.

 

IV.  The IT department only maintains the company's computer systems.

Truth:  Responsible for network security, data storage, web development and design, implementing new solutions and technologies, and disaster recovery. 

Also, the adoption, development, and implementation of other healthcare related tech such as Artificial Intelligence and Augmented Reality related solutions.

 

V.  The Sales department is only responsible for generating revenue.

Truth:  Responsible for customer service, customer support, market analysis, and product development.

 

VI.  The Customer Service department is only responsible for answering customer questions.

Truth:  Responsible for product returns, warranty claims, and technical or non-technical support.

 

VII.  The Operations department is responsible solely for running organization smoothly.

Truth:  Responsible for supply chain management, facilities management, and process improvement.

 

VIII.  The Legal department is only responsible for protecting the company from lawsuits.

Truth:  Responsible for contract negotiation, regulatory compliance, and intellectual property protection.

 

IX.  The HR department is the only department that deals with employee issues.

Truth:  The HR department deals with employee issues is true, but each individual department creates a positive work environment and helps resolve employee issues. 

However, all departments typically work with and report to HR as a central point for all departments.

 

X.  The Finance department is the only department that deals with money.

Truth:  The Finance department is not the only department that deals with the organization's finances.

All departments manage company finances and financial stability.

 

Why The Misunderstanding Confusion Around Healthcare

 

Image: Adriana Morales@Pixabay 

 

Healthcare is one of the most highly regulated industries in the world. Hospitals, clinics, and other care facilities must adhere to a complex web of federal, state, and local laws and regulations.

The purpose of these regulations is to protect patients' health and safety, along with healthcare professionals and the community.

However, the sheer number of rules and regulations can be overwhelming for healthcare providers.

Keeping up with all regulations, and changes to them, can be a full-time job. If a Provider or another employee makes a mistake, the consequences can be very serious. It is vital to have a Compliance Officer who understands the regulations and can help ensure the facility is in full compliance.

 

Common Regulations Healthcare Providers Comply With:

 

HIPAA

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act is a federal law that protects patients' privacy. HIPAA requires Healthcare Providers to keep patient information confidential and to take steps to prevent unauthorized access to it.

 

JCAHO

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations is a nonprofit organization that sets standards for healthcare facilities. JCAHO accreditation is voluntary, but many insurance companies will not reimburse providers who are not accredited.

 

Medicare

Medicare is a federal insurance program for people 65 and older, or those with certain disabilities. Medicare has strict rules about what services it will cover and how much it will pay for them.

 

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal-state insurance program for low-income people. Medicaid also has strict rules about what services it will cover and how much it will pay for them.

 

OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is a federal agency that sets standards for workplace safety. OSHA requires healthcare facilities to take steps to protect employees from injuries and illnesses.

 

These are just a few of the many regulations that healthcare providers must comply with. Compliance is essential to protecting patients and avoiding costly penalties. But it can still be an enormous challenge. 

Myths and misconceptions are normal when things are so complex, as it is within healthcare organization's and departments. The staff should be able to identify such fallacies and educate patients about them.

 

Other Healthcare Misconception Beliefs Identified

 

XI.  Patients with private insurance receive better quality care than those using public sector.

Truth:  No, this is not always the case. The quality of care you receive should not be based on your insurance coverage.

 

XII.  Hospitals and doctors are responsible for any medical errors that occur.

Truth:  Not true! While hospitals and doctors do have a responsibility to provide quality care, there are many Factors that can contribute to medical errors.

Those outside Factors include communication breakdowns, inadequate staffing, and poor facilities, and more.

 

XIII.  All medical research is biased.

Truth:  There is always going to be some bias in any kind of research, but that doesn't mean that all medical research is worthless.

Scientists and researchers try to minimize bias as much as possible by using standardized methods and procedures.

 

IVX.  If a patient is unhappy with their care, they can sue the healthcare provider.

Truth:  While it is true that patients can sue their healthcare providers, it is not always an effective way to improve the quality of care.

In many cases, the patient will not win the lawsuit, and even if they do, the amount of money they receive is often small compared to the cost of taking legal action.

 

XV.  Healthcare providers are required to give patients all the information about their condition.

Truth:  In some cases, such as when a patient has a terminal illness, the healthcare provider may feel that it is not in the best interest of the patient to know all the details about their condition.

 

XVI.  Healthcare Providers always have patients' best interests at heart.

Truth:  While this may be true in most cases, there are always going to be exceptions. There are some Healthcare Providers who may be more interested in making money than in providing quality care.

 

XVII.  The government is responsible to ensure all healthcare facilities meet certain standards.

Truth:  The government does have some regulations in place that healthcare facilities must follow, but there are many facilities that do not meet these standards.

 

XVIII.  All healthcare facilities are required to have malpractice insurance.

Truth:  In some cases, the facility may be self-insured or may not have insurance at all.

 

XIX.  All Physicians and Doctors are board certified.

Truth:  Only about 60% of all doctors in the United States are board certified.

 

XX.  All hospitals are accredited.

Truth:  Less than 50% of all hospitals in the United States are accredited.

 

XXI.  Medicaid is a government program that provides healthcare for low-income people.

Truth:  Medicaid is not the only program of its kind. There are also programs like Medicare and SCHIP that provide healthcare for other groups of people.

 

XXII.  People with pre-existing conditions cannot get health insurance.

Truth:  People with pre-existing conditions can get health insurance, but they may have to pay more for it than people who do not have pre-existing conditions.

 

XXIII.  Health insurance companies can deny coverage for any reason.

Truth:  Health insurance companies can deny coverage, but they must have a valid reason for doing so.

They cannot deny coverage simply because a person has a pre-existing condition.

 

XXIV.  All health insurance plans cover maternity care.

Truth:  Some plans may only cover the cost of delivery, while others may not cover any of the costs associated with pregnancy and childbirth.

 

XXV.  All health insurance plans cover mental health care.

Truth:  Not all health plans cover mental health care. In some cases, mental health care may be excluded from coverage entirely.

 

XXVI.  All health insurance plans cover prescription drugs.

Truth:  In some cases, prescription drugs may be excluded from coverage entirely.

 

XXVII.  Health insurance companies can cancel your policy at any time.

Truth:  Health insurance companies can cancel a policy, but they must have a valid reason for doing so.

They cannot cancel your policy simply because you get sick or have a pre-existing condition.

 

XXVIII.  Patients should always follow their doctor's orders without question.

Truth:  In some cases, such as when a patient is prescribed a medication that they are allergic to, it is important for the patient to question the doctor's orders and make sure that they understand the risks involved.

 

XXIX.  Doctors always have the most up-to-date information on medications and treatments.

Truth:  While this may be true in most cases, there are always going to be exceptions. There are some doctors who may not be up-to-date on the latest medications and treatments, and as a result, their patients may not receive the best possible care.

 

XXX.  Hospitals always provide the best possible care for their patients.

Truth:  While this may be true, there are always going to be exceptions.

There are some hospitals that may not be up-to-date on the latest medications and treatments, and as a result, their patients may not receive the best possible care.

 

XXXI.  Healthcare facilities are always clean and well-maintained.

Truth:  In some cases, healthcare facilities may be dirty or poorly maintained, and as a result, patients may not receive the best possible care.

 

XXXII.  All healthcare workers are highly trained and skilled.

Truth:  Many healthcare workers aren't highly as trained or skilled, nor have the proper amount of training, which does result in varying degrees of patient care.

 

 

Healthcare Misconceptions Final Thoughts:

 

Healthcare is a complex system of people and are responsible for many different aspects of the organization. 

We hope these 32 areas covered above help answer some of the misconceptions relating to complexities around healthcare organizations, departments and their responsibilities, organizational structure, management, and healthcare professionals in general. However, the most important aspect of all is that the facility operates smoothly and efficiently in order to provide the best quality of care as possible to their patients.